IS A FLÛTE THE BEST GLASS FOR BUBBELS?

NO, DEFINITELY NOT FOR ALL SPARKLING WINES.

YES

for sparkling wines with a fresh, fruity taste, intended for drinking young. These are most sparkling wines made according to the charmat or tank method ( see chapter 4), such as prosecco. In a flûte, the fruity taste comes to the fore and the wine continues to fizz for a long time.

NO

for sparkling wines with complex aging aromas. They need air to come into their own. In a narrow, tall glass, such as a flûte, the wine does not get enough air to show its best side. The more complex the sparkling wine, the wider the bowl of the glass.

For fresh, fruity sparkling wines. Prosecco, Asti spumante, sparkling wine and basic crémant, champagne and cava.

For more complex, sparkling wines. Cava, champagne and other sparkling wines made according to the traditional method.

In the Champagne region you will never get champagne in a flûte, but always in a tulip-shaped 'champagne glass'.

For special, complex sparkling wines with ripening aromas. Special cuvées and millésimés (sparkling wines from one harvest year).

TASTING PRACTICE PROSECCO

Place a flûte and a white wine or champagne glass next to each other.

Taste a prosecco from both glasses. Also pay attention to the bubbles.

Note the differences.

TASTING PRACTISE CHAMPAGNE

Place a flûte, a white wine or champagne glass, and a chardonnay glass next to each other.

Taste champagne from all glasses. Also pay attention to the bubbles.

Note the differences.